Starting a Business in Europe – Tips for Non European Natives

If you are a non-European native, starting a business in Europe can at times seem very daunting. The regulations you must adhere to change from country to country within Europe, cultural specifics often come into play, and finding someone who actually speaks the language of your corporate destination may be hard to find. Even when you cross all of those bridges, how do you figure out which accountants or attorneys to use? Sure, you could spend hours, even days, scouring the internet, interviewing business formation experts and studying up on all the relevant business laws, but isn’t there a better, quicker, more reliable way of starting a business in Europe? The good news is, if you follow the 5 tips regarding European company formation for foreigners below, your incorporation will be as fast and painless as possible.

1 – Use only local business pros based in Europe

Laws and regulations can change right in the middle of your incorporation efforts, and if you are not employing locals that live and work in the country of your choosing on a daily basis, you can be sunk. Demand that the European company formation expert you choose use only locally trained and headquartered European lawyers and accountants to handle your corporate filing. They work with the bureaucrats who do the paperwork for foreign and overseas business incorporation on a daily basis, and can ensure you the fastest, most stress-free filing possible, at the lowest cost.

2 – Employ a seasoned European corporation firm

New players to the scene arrive all the time, offering ridiculously low price points for incorporation. But before you go with the low ball estimate, ask about the company. Have they been in business long? How many countries do they handle? How many companies have they formed in the past? You are a successful business man or woman because you understand that you get what you pay for. Don’t be misled by bargain basement prices where starting a business in Europe is concerned.

3 – Choose the right country in Europe

There are 27 countries in the European Union (EU), and each one has the freedom to set their own incorporation regulations. When starting a business in Europe, choose carefully, and find the right one to suit your business’ unique needs. Need tax freedom? Ireland offers 0% tax for the first three years if you qualify. Want cheap, skilled labor? Spain may be the country for you. A seasoned company formation expert will know exactly what each country has to offer within Europe.

4 – Pick the right corporate entity in Europe

A Sole Proprietorship is a vastly different animal from a Limited Partnership or Limited Liability Company. The vehicle you choose for your business, whether it is a new start-up, or you are purchasing a ready-made shelf company, is vital to the success of the business goals your company has. And different business formations have different rewards and requirements from country to country.

5 – Get a free consultation

Either through the internet, or by phone, only deal with experts that give you a free consultation before starting a business in Europe. Flat fee only companies with upfront payment schedules should be avoided at all costs. And on that call, make sure the European corporate expert answers each and every question to your satisfaction. Then and only then will you feel comfortable that you are in the hands of a respectable, trustworthy firm with your successful corporation goals in mind.

Business Degrees – Preparing Undergraduates For a Global Career

There are brilliant opportunities for students to study business at undergraduate level, with the potential to enjoy a global career that involves a hectic, yet enjoyable lifestyle. Making the right decision with regards to both your university and the choice of your business degree can influence the success of your chosen career path.

It is no coincidence that the students with the best learning environment achieve the best results, and with the City of London widely regarded as the financial capital of the planet, British students have a great chance to study business degrees at a London business school.

London business schools provide students with business degrees that will help you enjoy a successful career in your chosen field. As you would expect, employment statistics for graduates from London business schools are consistently higher than the national average. The benefit of close relations to global conglomerates gives scholars the opportunity to secure professional work experience and network with companies for potential future employment.

Some business degrees provide undergraduates with the opportunity to spend a year or a term studying at partner institutions. Amazingly, this could be in Hong Kong, Singapore, the United States, Canada, South Korea or Europe, business really is an exciting global industry.

While UK business degrees are exciting and challenging, there are rigorous entry requirements and demands for courses are, naturally, exceedingly high. However, ambitious students who are ready to maximise the advantages of remarkable learning environments in the City of London should certainly enroll.

Bursaries and scholarships also make studying business and finance financially viable with awards generally made to UK, EU and international students on the basis of academic merit as well as financial status.

Business Aviation

Cessna Citation X

In November 2009 Cessna Aircraft Company, a Textron Inc. company, delivered the 300th Cessna Citation X. The Citation X has enjoyed most recent success in Russia and Eastern Europe.

The Cessna Citation X is the world’s fastest non-military aircraft, top speed very close to the speed of sound at.92 Mach. Launched in 1990, the Citation X is the top of Cessna’s range of light and mid-size business jets.

Cessna Aircraft Company is the world’s largest manufacturer of general aviation aircraft. Having produced more than 6,000 Cessna Citations, they are also the manufacturer of the largest fleet of business jets in the world.

Cessna Authorised Service Centre London England, jewel amongst FBOs Europe

In the UK, one of the major business aviation centres in Europe and FBOs Europe, Marshall Aerospace Business Aviation Centre London England has during the noughties been awarded Cessna’s Citation Service Centre Parts Sales Performance Award for two years in succession. They can see Cessna Inventory as becoming a key growth area for the company. They are busy developing maintenance hangars and AOG support teams with the capability to offer AOG support to customers with a “round-the-clock” global corporate aircraft maintenance service for business aircraft commercial operators.

Based at the Marshall Airport Cambridge in the UK, Marshall has been established in the business, corporate and general aviation sector for over 40 years. They have enjoyed the status of a Cessna Authorised Service Centre London England for over 30 years. To meet growing demand, the company is currently doubling its business aviation facilities with a new integrated MRO/ FBO capability at Cambridge.

Global contrast, Production and job cuts.

All of this is good news and takes a long term view at a time of global recession. In the short term, Gulfstream is reducing mid-sized aircraft production. New orders are down despite a large-cabin backlog increasing production in 2009. Cessna announced at the beginning of the year that it would be cutting jobs in a $30 million restructuring. The slowdown in the private jet industry has knocked on the head, at least temporarily, Cessna’s new plane, the Citation Columbus.

The private jet industry has blamed last summer’s fuel price spike, the recession, and public opinion about private jet travel. Bombardier too said that it would be slowing production of Learjet and Challenger. Embraer also released a 20-year market forecast predicting a 10% drop in demand for regional jets, which included a 60% decline for the 30- to 60-seat market sector.

Business aviation has an image problem which includes the negative publicity surrounding the episode late in 2008 when the heads of America’s troubled automotive manufacturers travelled in corporate jets to Washington to ask for government bail-outs.